Undershirts, underwear and socks

Another Father’s Day has come and gone. It happens so quickly. That’s why I came up with the idea of Father’s Week. For some reason, it never seemed to catch on, at least not with my family. 

“What do you want for Father’s Day, Dad?”

That’s a question I receive from my kids before Father’ Day each year. And, each year, I give them the same answer: “How about undershirts, underwear or socks?”

“That’s really boring,” they reply in unison. To which I say, “But that’s what I need.”

Then they buy me something more fun — like a remote-controlled toy truck — and I go out and buy myself undershirts, underwear and socks. 

I used to buy my dad undershirts, underwear and socks. Well, actually, my mom bought them for me to give to him. Regardless, he seemed to appreciate them, and I am starting to understand why. The older I get, the less I like to shop… for anything. But there are some things a guy just has to have. Like undershirts, underwear and socks. 

Dads used to receive neckties for Father’s Day, but who wears neckties today? If you do, let me know. I have dozens of them you can have. Or maybe we can work out a trade — for undershirts, underwear and socks. Not used ones, of course. I am thrifty, but not that thrifty. 

Maybe if I did wear neckties, you wouldn’t be able to see my dingy undershirts. And then I wouldn’t have to buy undershirts, underwear and socks so often. Or maybe I will just buy what I really wanted for Father’s Day this year, which was, of course, another remote-controlled toy truck. 

Have a terrific Tuesday, and thanks for reading. 

Shane Goodman
Editor and Publisher
Times Vedette digital editions
shane@dmcityview.com
641-755-2115

Any interest?

Sixteen dollars. That was the profit I made from selling my toys and games at a garage sale that my mother had when I was 7 years old. That collection of cash and coins was what I carried with me to Home Federal Savings and Loan to open my first savings account in 1975. The bank teller even handed me a folded and stapled passport in a plastic sleeve that had the deposit transaction printed on it. A few years went by before I made any additional deposits from my lawn-mowing money, but it was then when I realized what interest was all about. That $16 I deposited had somehow grown. I didn’t understand how, but I liked it. 

I became fascinated — maybe obsessed — with the entire process of making deposits and growing my savings. As I started walking beans and detasseling corn, the REAL money began to come in. I felt personal victories with each savings milestone— $100, $200, $300 and so on. When I turned 15, I started working at a gas station and received a regular paycheck, but the savings process was still the same. I walked up to the bank, deposited my check and fixed my eyes on that passport to see how much I earned in interest. 

Today I realize how minimal the interest on savings accounts is, but I also am not much of a risk-taker in the markets. So, I still deposit savings with the passion I had as a kid. Admittedly, with auto-deposits, ATM withdrawals and online banking, I don’t get the same satisfaction I had as a child when gazing at the entire history of my deposits and withdrawals on that printed passport in the bank lobby, but that’s OK.

As for that original Home Federal Savings and Loan passport, I still have it stored away in a box in the basement, complete with the now-yellowed plastic sleeve and the memory of my first $16. It seems money is not the only thing I save. 

Have a fantastic Friday, and thanks for reading.

Shane Goodman
Editor and Publisher
Times Vedette digital editions
shane@dmcityview.com
641-755-2115

383 votes… and counting

The votes keep pouring in —  and I am not referring to the recent primary elections. Our Best of Guthrie County poll is now up to 383 votes, which surpasses the number cast for any of the candidates in Tuesday’s ballot boxes. I am not sure what that says, but we certainly appreciate your support of the people, businesses, places and events of Guthrie County by voting in our poll. 

If you haven’t voted yet, there is still time, as the poll will be open through July 15.  There are 82 categories to vote in ranging from best place to take your dog, to best plumber, to best dinner spot. You can even vote for best teacher, best coach and, yes, best elected official. 

If you are curious about the leaders so far, I will give you a few examples, in no particular order. Keep in mind the results can — and will — change by July 15. 

  • For Best Guthrie County First Date spot, Prime Time and The Port are neck in neck.
  • Tin Lizzie’s Sports Bar is off to a commanding lead for Best Guthrie County Happy Hour.
  • Best Guthrie County Local Band or Musician has 18 candidates in the running with Dale Menning & the Stardusters, Kile Jackson, Jake Kemble and Chancey Hill in the lead at the moment.
  • Best Guthrie County Golf Course spurred a number of votes with Lake Panorama National at the top of the list.
  • Dowd Drug, Medicap Pharmacy and Wright Pharmacy are gaining the bulk of the votes at the moment for Best Guthrie County Pharmacy.
  • Best Guthrie County Coffee Shop in the county is a tight contest with Crafty’s Coffee and Gifts, Casey Creamery and the The Cup on 2nd battling it out.
  • Campers have casted many votes for Best Guthrie County Camping Spot with Nations Bridge Park, Springbrook State Park and Lenon Mill Park gaining the most to date.
  • And Best Guthrie County elected official is a heated race with Maggie Armstrong, Marty Arganbright and Steve Smith at the top so far.

Agree with the results so far? Disagree? Well, your vote can make a difference. Cast it now at https://gctimesnews.com/best-of.

Have a fantastic Friday, and thanks for reading.

Shane Goodman
Editor and Publisher
Times Vedette digital editions
shane@dmcityview.com
641-755-2115

Shoe-tying and cowboy boots

I am not a cowboy, but I do have the boots — or at least I used to. 

Here’s the story. For one reason or another, I was late to the game in learning how to tie my shoes. In fact, I was the only kid in my kindergarten class who had not figured it out. It wasn’t due to a lack of effort on my part. I tried and tried to learn how to properly assemble those shoelaces. All I ended up doing was tying strings around my fingers. It was frustrating, even for a 5-year-old.

What I lacked in fine motor skills I made up for in ingenuity. I had a solution — cowboy boots. Yes, cowboy boots. Simple to put on. Simple to take off. And none of those annoying shoelaces. They weren’t fashion-friendly with shorts, but I mostly went barefoot in the summer months anyway. When the school year rolled around, this kid looked like Roy Rogers.

In case you are wondering, I wasn’t a farm kid. I grew up in town, so I was apparently urban cowboy before urban cowboy was cool. But a trendsetter, I was not. No other kid in my class wore cowboy boots, not even the farm kids. They all knew how to tie their shoes. 

I eventually learned this life skill, sometime in the first grade. I may not remember the exact date, but I know it was a glorious moment. After a few years of others showing me how easy this was, I finally figured it out. Something just clicked, and then I proudly showed everyone how I could tie my shoes. Most didn’t understand my moment of pride, but that’s OK. They also didn’t wear cowboy boots to kindergarten class every day. 

Have a terrific Tuesday, and thanks for reading.

Shane Goodman
Editor and Publisher
Times Vedette digital editions
shane@dmcityview.com
641-755-2115

Almedia, Cola, Grover and Orange

“Remember that a person’s name is, to that person, the sweetest and most important sound in any language.” Those are the insightful words of Dale Carnegie in “How to Win Friends and Influence People.”

I was reminded of Carnegie’s advice after reading a story this week at TODAY.com about parents who are discovering baby name ideas by visiting cemeteries. A woman interviewed in the story said she is considering the names Galloway and Salem for her unborn daughter after perusing her local graveyards.

Of course, expecting parents could choose from the most popular baby names in Iowa, which were recently released by the Social Security Administration. For boys, tops on the list from 2023 were Oliver, Henry, Theodore, Liam and Noah. For girls, Charlotte, Olivia, Amelia, Harper and Evelyn were the most chosen. Those are certainly great names, but I am intrigued by the ones chosen by parents who stroll through cemeteries for ideas. This made me wonder what unique names I could find locally. So, I visited Union Cemetery in Guthrie Center and West Cemetery in Panora. 

Names that begin with vowels were seemingly popular. I found Adah and Adelaide and Aletha and Almedia, as well as Alonzo, Amasa and Arminta. Edith, Edna, Effie, Elda, Eliza, Elmer, Elzina, Ernest, Ethel, Etta, Eunice and Eva were there, too, along with Ida, Irene, Irving and Iva. I came across Ollie, Opal, Orah and even Orange. The U’s were unique, though, as Udo was all I could locate. 

Bertha and Birtha were in the cemeteries, along with Bessie, Blanche and Burdette. Don’t forget Cecil and Cecile or Clara and Clyde — and two of my favorites, Cola and Coral.

I am partial to my initials, which made Garfield, Gaynell, Gertrude, Glendel, Golson and Grover stick out. I could not find a Shane, but I did see Samford and Silas. 

If you are researching baby names, you might consider Dell or Della or Delores or Doris. And why not? They all found their final resting places in Guthrie County, as did Ferne, Flora, Florence, Ford, Frances and Franklin.

And here are some more that made me smile: Harald, Hattie, Hazel, Hester, Hiram and Hubert. You may also like Lafe, Lans, Larkin, Lena, Leora, Lesta, Lodema, Lottie, Lucelia, Lucinda and Luella.

I could only find Parr, Perssis, Pfenetta, Mamie, Mazie, Nels, Retta and Romie each once, but Mabel, Marguerite, Marietta, Mildred, Milton, Myron and Myrtle were aplenty.

And finally, let’s not forget the classic names that would score high in Scrabble: Verna, Vida, Viola, Viollia, Voshel, Zella, Zenis and Zilma.

If this doesn’t conjure up some good baby name ideas, then I don’t know what will — except your own walk through a local cemetery. I highly recommend it. 

Have a fantastic Friday, and thanks for reading.

Shane Goodman
Editor and Publisher
Times Vedette digital editions
shane@dmcityview.com
641-755-2115

Encyclopedias were the internet in print

Encyclopedias have been around for about 2,000 years, but good luck trying to find a printed edition now. How could something that was so common for generations be essentially non-existent today? As newspaper and magazine publishers discovered, selling anything for a fee can be difficult when you give most of it away online for free. 

For the younger readers of this newsletter, encyclopedias were like the internet in print — only more accurate. They were valued sources of information from the experts of the day. The printed and bound versions were found in libraries, schools and other educational institutions. They were also found in many homes. 

The encyclopedia salesman was commonly seen walking door to door and selling the benefits of having a full set of these reference materials in your house. At its peak, industry leader Encyclopedia Britannica had about 2,300 employees in the United States and Canada. I remember seeing their well-trained sales staff in our neighborhood as a child.

I asked our office staff if they had encyclopedias in their childhood homes. Those who are 40 or older smiled and nodded. Those 40 or younger looked puzzled. One said she thought they might have had CD-ROMS. 

My mother bought an off-brand used set of encyclopedias for our family in the late 1970s. They were miniature-sized but were still quite helpful with classroom assignments and to settle an occasional argument of facts. Unlike information from the Internet, this data was indisputable. 

Prior to the Internet, research projects required the use of encyclopedias. I worked at the library during my freshman year in college, and I was amazed how many encyclopedias had articles cut out of them and how many students would become frustrated because they needed that information. The librarians I knew were even-keeled, but this would get them steaming. 

Encyclopedia Britannica quit publishing print editions in 1996. After 244 years, the company decided to go digital. The salesmen were laid off, and the multi-volume sets ended. At the time, the remaining 32-volume editions were retailing for $1,395. Today, an online subscription is $74.95 annually or $8.99 per month. 

You can pay those fees, or, like many people unfortunately do today, you can roll the fact-finding dice on the Internet for free. 

Have a terrific Tuesday, and thanks for reading.

Shane Goodman
Editor and Publisher
Times Vedette digital editions
shane@dmcityview.com
641-755-2115