Weekly Crop Progress and Condition Report — July 16, 2024

From the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November. Additionally, the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship provides a weather summary each week during this time.

“Although the first half of July was cooler and wetter than average, Iowa’s tasseling corn encountered some summer heat and humidity this past weekend,” Secretary Naig said. “Monday’s thunderstorms will give way to more seasonal conditions and cooler temperatures. This will be welcome news for our state’s livestock as well as those participating in county fairs around the state.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop report

Most of the State received below normal rainfall and experienced mild temperatures. These conditions allowed Iowa farmers 5.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 14, 2024, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Field activities included harvesting oats for grain, cutting and baling hay, and applying fungicides.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 0 percent very short, 6 percent short, 84 percent adequate and 10 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 1 percent very short, 8 percent short, 82 percent adequate and 9 percent surplus. Corn silking or beyond reached 44 percent, 1 day ahead of last year and 3 days ahead of the five-year average. Corn crop in the dough stage reached 6 percent, 5 days ahead of the average.

Corn condition rated 74 percent good to excellent. Soybean crop blooming reached 50 percent, 3 days behind last year. Soybeans setting pods reached 12 percent, 1 day behind last year but equal to the five-year average. Soybean condition rated 72 percent good to excellent. Oats turning color reached 82 percent, 5 days ahead of the average. Oat harvest for grain jumped to 26 percent complete, 1 week ahead of the average. Oat condition was 77 percent good to excellent.

The State’s second cutting of alfalfa hay reached 57 percent complete, 5 days behind last year but 2 days ahead of the average. Hay condition rated 78 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 71 percent good to excellent. Some pastures remain flooded and where floodwaters have receded some pastures are covered in silt.

Weather summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowans experienced near-normal temperatures for most of the reporting period before unseasonable warmth returned towards the end of the week; the statewide average temperature was 73.7 degrees, 1.0 degree below normal. Rainfall was reported statewide, though most stations registered below average totals; only the far northeast corner received above normal rain.

Thundershowers continued to fire on Sunday (7th) afternoon with stronger storms forming in western and northern Iowa over the evening hours. The cells consolidated as they moved into central Iowa and then pushed east through the early morning hours of Monday (8th). There were several reports of severe straight line winds and large hail; Albion (Marshall County) registered a 69 mph gust while two-inch hail was observed in Sheldon (O’Brien County). More than half of Iowa’s stations reporting rainfall had at least 0.30 inch with higher totals from north-central to southeast Iowa; Marshalltown (Marshall County) measured 1.61 inches with 2.01 inches at Bloomfield (Davis County). Clouds cleared west to east through the day with temperatures in the upper 70s and low 80s. Spotty thundershowers also popped across eastern Iowa with several stations reporting measurable amounts near an inch; two Lee County stations, Fort Madison and West Point, reported 0.71 and 0.93 inch, respectively. Clear skies and light winds developed overnight with Tuesday (9th) morning lows in the mid to upper 60s. High level clouds from the remains of Hurricane Beryl overspread the state into the afternoon with highs ranging from the low 70s southeast to low 80s northwest. An upper level low pressure center sitting over the Upper Midwest spun showers and thunderstorms into northern Iowa after midnight with further development later in the day on Wednesday (10th). Stronger storms formed along the Iowa-Missouri border into the evening where locally heavy downpours were observed. Slow moving thunderstorms persisted in east-central Iowa over the early hours of Wednesday (10th). Morning lows dropped into the upper 50s in western Iowa with conditions up to ten degrees warmer east. Rain totals were highest in eastern and southwest Iowa with 1.20 inches in Creston (Union County) and 2.13 inches in Coralville (Johnson County). General rainfall amounts were in the 0.20 to 0.40 inch range with a statewide average of 0.23 inch. Daytime conditions were partly cloudy with variable winds and temperatures in the lows 70s north to low 80s south.

High pressure dominated the weather pattern on Thursday (11th) with morning temperatures in the 60s and patchy fog across southern Iowa. Wind shifted to the east through the day with pleasant temperatures in the low 80s under mostly sunny skies. Stars were visible overnight into Friday (12th) as morning temperatures bottomed out in the low to mid 60s. A shift to southeasterly winds boosted highs in the upper 80s over western Iowa while the low to mid 80s were reported across the rest of Iowa. Foggy conditions were observed at daybreak on Saturday (13th) with unseasonably warm morning temperatures in the low 70s under generally clear skies. Gusty southerly winds built in through the day with temperatures from the mid 80s northeast to low 90s south and west. Spotty clouds developed in central to northeastern Iowa as a fast moving complex of thunderstorms, some severe, moved along the Iowa-Wisconsin border after sunset. A secondary line moved over the same region with additional development in eastern Iowa into early Sunday (14th). Several stations in northeastern Iowa observed rainfall with 0.50 inch in Dubuque (Dubuque County) and Elkader (Clayton County) to 0.98 inch at Guttenberg Lock and Dam (Clayton County).

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from a trace at Spencer Municipal Airport (Clay County) to 2.56 inches in Lowden (Cedar County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.70 inch, while the normal is 1.05 inches. Little Sioux (Harrison County) reported the week’s high temperature of 94 degrees on the 13th, eight degrees above normal. Mapleton (Monona County) reported the week’s low temperature of 53 degrees on the 10th, nine degrees below normal.

Weekly Crop Progress and Condition Report — July 9, 2024 

From the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November. Additionally, the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship provides a weather summary each week during this time.

“Many parts of Iowa experienced a wet start to July. Now, we’re hoping for some summer heat to provide a much-needed boost to our crops,” said Secretary Naig. “With the continued impacts of Hurricane Beryl influencing the weather pattern, forecasts indicate a calmer storm track for Iowa and increased chances of warmer temperatures over the next few weeks.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop report

The south central and northeast portions of the State received heavy rains in comparison to the northwest portion of the State. These conditions only allowed Iowa farmers 3.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending July 7, 2024, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Concerns were expressed about getting hay put up and spraying for weeds due to frequent rain. 

Topsoil moisture condition rated 0 percent very short, 4 percent short, 77 percent adequate and 19 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 0 percent very short, 6 percent short, 77 percent adequate and 17 percent surplus.

Corn silking reached 17 percent, equal to last year but 4 days ahead of the five-year average. Corn condition was 76 percent good to excellent. Soybean crop blooming reached 32 percent, 2 days behind last year but equal to the average. Soybeans setting pods reached 5 percent. Soybean condition rated 76 percent good to excellent. Oat crop headed or beyond reached 95 percent. Oats turning color reached 63 percent, 5 days ahead of the average. Oats harvested for grain was 8 percent complete, 6 days ahead of the average. Oat condition rated 79 percent good to excellent.

The State’s second cutting of alfalfa hay reached 34 percent complete. Hay condition rated 81 percent good to excellent.  Pasture condition rated 73 percent good to excellent. Feedlot conditions remain muddy due to excess precipitation and flooding.

Weather summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

July’s first reporting period was unseasonably wet for most of Iowa with many stations observing at least 150% of normal rainfall; portions of southern and northeast Iowa were particularly wet. Clouds and rainfall helped hold down temperatures as Iowa experienced cooler than average conditions; the statewide average temperature was 69.5 degrees, 4.2 degrees below normal.

Sunday (30th) afternoon was ideal across Iowa with daytime temperatures in the low to mid 70s, light winds and sunny skies. Winds swung around to an easterly direction through Monday (1st) morning with lows in the upper 50s and low 60s east to west under increasing clouds. Light to moderate showers pushed into western Iowa and moved east through the day while eastern Iowa remained clear with highs in the low 70s; temperatures held in the 60s under clouds and rain. Showers dissipated farther east just before sunset. A secondary disturbance brought widespread showers and thunderstorms over much of Iowa’s northwestern two-thirds overnight into Tuesday (2nd). Most stations received at least 0.25 inch with nearly 80 observing at least an inch and a statewide average of 0.66 inch. Very heavy rainfall was reported from slow-moving thunderstorms across a narrow band stretching from southwest to central Iowa; Truro (Madison County) measured 2.81 inches while two stations in Mills County, Hastings and Pacific Junction, collected 4.28 and 6.10 inches, respectively. Afternoon temperatures quickly rose into the mid to upper 80s over southeastern Iowa as a warm front lifted out of Missouri ahead of a strong low pressure center. As the low’s attendant cold front slammed into the warm and unstable airmass, a line of strong to severe thunderstorms fired in central Iowa and quickly advanced east. Several storms became tornado-warned with two confirmed tornadoes near Iowa City (Johnson County) and Nichols (Muscatine County). The line exited eastern Iowa after sunset with thundershowers remaining in southeastern Iowa into Wednesday (3rd) morning. Nearly 150 stations measured an inch of rainfall with 20 stations at or above 2.00 inches from central to eastern Iowa; an observer in Prole (Warren County) recorded 2.01 inches while 3.28 inches was reported in Pella (Marion County). A vast majority of Iowa’s stations reported measurable rainfall with a statewide average of 0.86 inch.

Conditions for the rest of the day were clear with a westerly wind and highs in the low to mid 80s. Showers and a few rumbles of thunder were observed through the overnight hours into Thursday (4th) along both north and south state lines. Rain totals were generally under 0.30 inch where it fell, though Estherville (Emmett County) collected 0.55 inch with 0.80 inch in Russell (Lucas County). Afternoon temperatures rose into the upper 70s and low 80s for much of Iowa as stronger thunderstorms fired along a cold front in northern Iowa through the late afternoon and evening hours. The narrow line sped across eastern Iowa just as Independence Day fireworks lit the night sky for most Iowans. Morning lows on Friday (5th) held in the low to mid 60s with 7:00 am rain totals highest over northern Iowa where most stations reported 0.25 to 0.75 inch; a handful of stations measured higher totals with 1.00 inch at Mount Auburn (Benton County) to 1.44 inches in Ringsted (Emmet County). Winds shifted northwesterly through the day with temperatures in the mid to upper 70s under partly sunny skies. Isolated showers continued to push into Iowa as a low pressure center spun over Wisconsin. Clearing skies and calm winds helped patchy fog form as lows remained in the 60s early Saturday (6th) morning. Isolated severe storms fired in north-central Iowa in the late afternoon ahead of another boundary that would bring stronger storms to the southwest later in the night. Additional storms were observed in central to eastern Iowa near daybreak on Sunday (7th). There were several pockets of heavier rainfall with 1.54 inches in Zearing (Story County) to 2.23 inches in Garwin (Tama County). Morning temperatures held in the upper 50s northwest to upper 60s southeast.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from 0.27 inch in Remsen (Plymouth County) to 6.31 inches in Pacific Junction (Mills County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 2.11 inches, nearly double the normal of 1.08 inches. Centerville (Appanoose County) reported the week’s high temperature of 91 degrees on the 2nd, six degrees above normal. Elkader (Clayton County) reported the week’s low temperature of 47 degrees on the 1st, 12 degrees below normal.

Weekly Crop Progress and Condition Report — June 25, 2024 

From the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November. Additionally, the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship provides a weather summary each week during this time.

“Northwest Iowa is experiencing historic flooding not seen since 1993. While the forecast is showing a reprieve from additional rainfall, those downstream need to be prepared as this water heads south,” said Secretary Naig. “Our hearts go out to all the Iowans affected by this devastating flooding. We do not yet know the full picture of damage to homes, businesses, farms, crops, livestock, communities and public infrastructure, but we know that it is likely to be substantial and costly. Iowans are resilient and we will get through this together, but this recovery will certainly take some time and require considerable resources.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop report

Northwest Iowa farmers received substantial rainfall with flood conditions while some Southeast Iowa farmers had minimal precipitation.  Statewide there were 3.9 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 23, 2024, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Spraying and other field activities were limited in some areas due to wet field conditions.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 1 percent very short, 8 percent short, 74 percent adequate and 17 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 1 percent very short, 11 percent short, 71 percent adequate and 17 percent surplus. Excessive rain fell in northwest Iowa with over 50 percent of the area reported with surplus topsoil and subsoil moisture.

Corn emergence neared completion. Corn condition rated 77 percent good to excellent. Soybeans emerged reached 95 percent. Seven percent of soybean crop was blooming, 1 day behind last year but 2 days ahead of the 5-year average.  Soybean condition rated 74 percent good to excellent. Eighty-six percent of the oat crop was headed or beyond, 6 days ahead of the average. Twenty-eight percent of oats were turning color, 9 days ahead of the average. Oat condition rated 73 percent good to excellent.

Ninety-five percent of the State’s first cutting of alfalfa hay has been completed, 6 days ahead of last year. Hay condition rated 78 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition decreased two percentage points to 73 percent good to excellent. Feedlots remain muddy due to excess rainfall.

Weather summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

A large-scale heat dome over the eastern United States set up a weather pattern known as a “Ring of Fire” which produced several waves of heavy rainfall from disturbances propagating over the Upper Midwest; some stations in northwest and north-central Iowa received several months’ worth of rainfall, on the order of 300-600 percent of normal. Farther southeast, temperatures were six to eight degrees above normal with the statewide average temperature at 75.4 degrees, 4.0 degrees above normal.

Showers and thunderstorms pushed out of eastern Iowa early on Sunday (16th) afternoon as clouds cleared west to east. Southerly winds increased as temperatures rose into the mid to upper 80s with lower 90s from central to southwest Iowa. Clouds increased over northwest Iowa overnight into Monday (17th) as a strong low pressure center pushed along the Iowa-Minnesota border. Thunderstorms along the initial line were severe warned with reports of straight line winds and very heavy rain. There was a brief lull in thunderstorm activity through the afternoon hours as daytime highs reached the low to mid 90s in eastern Iowa. Thunderstorms refired across northwestern Iowa and sped east into the evening; four stations in Dickinson County observed totals from 2.60 inches in Lake Park to 4.76 inches at Spirit Lake with almost 30 stations registering at least an inch. Partly cloudy skies persisted over southern Iowa through Tuesday (18th) morning with unseasonably warm morning temperatures in the mid to upper 70s.

Afternoon temperatures in the 80s coupled with higher dew points ahead of a strong cold front helped strong to severe thunderstorms form over western Iowa during the early evening. The line, initially narrow and concentrated, expanded and lost strength as it moved through central Iowa. Redevelopment occurred into Wednesday (19th) and persisted over central and eastern Iowa into the nighttime hours. Event rain totals were highest southwest, central and east with most Iowa stations accumulating at least 0.50 inch. Thirty stations observed 2.00 inches or more with 3.00 inches in North Liberty (Johnson County) to 4.30 inches in Creston (Union County) and a statewide average of 0.86 inch.

A stationary front draped across the state was a forcing mechanism for slow moving showers and thunderstorms along the Iowa-Minnesota border on Thursday (20th). Several flash flood warnings were issued for northwestern counties as three Rock Rapids (Lyon County) stations reported from 5.45 to 6.20 inches. Totals for adjacent counties were also anomalously high, ranging from 3.20 inches in Sheldon (O’Brien County) to 3.87 inches at Estherville Municipal Airport (Emmet County). Skies remained overcast across much of northern and eastern Iowa into Friday (21st) as another disturbance slowly propagated through northern Iowa as scattered thundershowers popped across southern Iowa. Widespread and slow moving thunderstorms brought additional higher-end totals on top of the previous day’s accumulations that were already more than a month’s worth at several stations. Seventy five stations reported an inch with 26 locations registering at least 3.00 inches. The highest totals ranged from 4.18 inches in Milford (Dickinson County) to 5.50 inches in Forest City (Winnebago County). Amounts tapered off to a few tenths of an inch in southern Iowa with an overall statewide average of 0.78 inch. The complex continued into northeastern Iowa by daybreak on Saturday (22nd) with morning lows in the upper 60s northwest to upper 70s southeast. Afternoon temperatures were in the mid to upper 80s in eastern Iowa as a cold front clashed with the warm and saturated airmass during the evening hours. A few storms were tornado warned, though nothing was observed on the ground. Heavy rain fell in the northeast with 2.12 inches in Oelwein (Fayette County) to 2.59 inches in Waukon (Allamakee County) with most of eastern Iowa registering 0.25 to 0.50 inches. Skies cleared overnight as winds shifted to the northeast behind the front. Sunday (23rd) morning was pleasant with lows in the 60s.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from 0.04 inch at Donnellson (Lee County) to 12.98 inches in Lake Park (Dickinson County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 2.76 inches while the normal is 1.17 inches. Williamsburg (Iowa County) reported the week’s high temperature of 95 degrees on the 17th, 14 degrees above normal. Multiple stations reported the week’s low temperature of 56 degrees on the 17th and 20th, on average two degrees below normal.

Weekly Crop Progress and Condition Report — June 18, 2024

From the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November. Additionally, the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship provides a weather summary each week during this time.

“Summer officially begins this week, and Iowans can expect temperatures that match the season. After the frustrating planting delays, crops seem to be catching up nicely,” said Secretary Naig. “Both corn and soybeans will continue to benefit from the forecasts indicating unseasonable warmth with above average chances for rain through the end of June.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

 

Crop report

Despite some isolated rain showers, warm temperatures and mostly dry weather resulted in 5.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 16, 2024, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Primary field activities were finishing up corn and soybean planting and re-planting. Other field activities included cutting hay and spraying crops.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 1 percent very short, 12 percent short, 77 percent adequate and 10 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 2 percent very short, 14 percent short, 75 percent adequate and 9 percent surplus.

Corn emergence is nearing completion at 95 percent. Corn condition rated 74 percent good to excellent. Eighty-six percent of the soybean crop has emerged, almost 2 weeks behind last year and 1 day behind the 5-year average. Soybean condition rated 74 percent good to excellent. Oats headed reached 74 percent, 2 days behind last year but 1 week ahead of the average. Nineteen percent of oats were turning color, 6 days ahead of last year and 13 days ahead of the 5-year average. Oat condition rated 81 percent good to excellent.

The State’s first cutting of alfalfa hay reached 89 percent complete, 6 days behind last year. Hay condition rated 80 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 75 percent good to excellent. Some cattle feedlots remain muddy.

 

Weather summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The last full week of astronomical spring brought warmth and unseasonable dryness to most of Iowa. Stations in eastern Iowa did not report any measurable rainfall with widespread departures between 0.50 to 1.00 inch elsewhere. Temperatures were three degrees above normal south-central and northwest; the statewide average temperature was 71.9 degrees, 1.8 degrees above normal.

Gusty northwesterly winds developed into Sunday (9th) afternoon under sunny skies and daytime temperatures in the upper 70s and low 80s. Spotty clouds passed through eastern Iowa into Monday (10th) with morning lows in the 50s statewide. Afternoon conditions were pleasant with variable winds and temperatures in the low to mid 70s at most Iowa stations. Winds shifted southerly overnight with Tuesday (11th) morning lows ranging from the low 50s southeast to mid 60s northwest as a low pressure center skirted the Iowa-Minnesota border. Light showers formed along the low’s attendant cold front, though totals were under 0.10 inch across northern and central Iowa as rain dissipated farther east. Afternoon temperatures rose into the upper 80s in northwestern Iowa even as winds shifted northwest behind the front. Stations in eastern Iowa remained in the upper 70s and low 80s. Morning lows on Wednesday (12th) held in the 60s across the state as southerly winds brought in warmer temperatures and higher dewpoints. An outflow boundary from convection in Minnesota fired stronger storms in northeastern Iowa just after noon. These storms continued east with several high wind reports as isolated, severe warned supercells formed in western Iowa and slowly moved south. Hail in the 1.50-2.50-inch diameter range was observed from Sioux City (Woodbury County) to Council Bluffs (Pottawattamie County) with a 3.50-inch hailstone in Onawa (Monona County). Heavier rainfall was also observed along this southward track with 0.63 inch in Blencoe (Monona County) to 1.03 inches in Pacific Junction (Mills County). Stations in the northeast corner also accumulated higher totals with 0.44 inch at Decorah Municipal Airport (Winneshiek County) and 0.65 inch at Lansing (Allamakee County); amounts in between these two regions were in the 0.10-0.25-inch range where rain fell.

Thursday (13th) started unseasonably warm and humid with morning temperatures in the upper 60s to low 70s. A cold front dropped through the state over the next several hours, encountering a warm and unstable airmass over southern Iowa. Supercells quickly developed along with large hail and localized heavy rain. Observers in Keosauqua (Van Buren County) reported 3.00-inch diameter hail while an 80-mph wind gust was observed farther northeast in Oakville (Louisa County). Six stations across Des Moines, Lee and Van Buren counties reported totals ranging from 1.09 inches to 1.73 inches with amounts in the 0.40-0.80-inch range in adjacent locations. Nighttime conditions cooled behind the front with morning lows in the mid to upper 50s over northern Iowa. Friday (14th) was unseasonably warm with low relative humidity and air temperatures in the upper 80s across southern Iowa under sunny skies; temperatures to the north were five to 10 degrees cooler. Winds shifted easterly overnight as an organized complex of thunderstorms, known as a Mesoscale Convective System (MCS) approached Iowa from Nebraska. The MCS brought measurable rain to western Iowa through Saturday (15th) morning and then into the afternoon hours in eastern Iowa. A secondary disturbance with strong to severe thunderstorms moved into Iowa during the evening hours and sped through central to northeast Iowa overnight. Except for Iowa’s southeast corner, totals for the two systems reported at 7:00 am on Sunday (16th) were in the 0.30-to-0.75-inch range with the highest totals north and in the southwest quadrant; Clarinda (Page County) hit an inch with 1.52 inches reported in Kesley (Butler County) and Shenandoah (Page County).

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from no accumulation at multiple stations to 2.59 inches in Spirit Lake (Dickinson County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.62 inch while the normal is 1.19 inches. Little Sioux (Harrison County) reported the week’s high temperature of 95 degrees on the 12th, 13 degrees above normal. Iowa City (Johnson County) reported the week’s low temperature of 43 degrees on the 11th, 15 degrees below normal.

Weekly Crop Progress and Condition Report — June 11, 2024

From the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November. Additionally, the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship provides a weather summary each week during this time.

“Summer heat is arriving just in time to give crops a good boost,” Secretary Naig said. “Weather outlooks into the second half of June, when farmers are completing important field applications and baling hay, indicate warmer temperatures and better chances of showers and thunderstorms.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop report

Warm and drier weather throughout the State allowed Iowa farmers 4.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 9, 2024, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Planting and replanting of corn and soybeans and spraying were limited due to wet field conditions.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 0 percent very short, 5 percent short, 78 percent adequate and 17 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 1 percent very short, 9 percent short, 77 percent adequate and 13 percent surplus. 

Corn planting is nearly complete with 89 percent emerged, 9 days behind last year and 2 days behind the 5-year average. Corn condition rated at 73 percent good to excellent. Ninety-two percent of the expected soybean crop has been planted, equal to the 5-year average. Seventy-five percent of the soybean crop has emerged, 9 days behind last year and 1 day behind the average. Soybean condition rated 73 percent good to excellent. Emergence of the oat crop is nearly complete with 59 percent headed, 8 days ahead of the average. Oat condition rated to 81 percent good to excellent.

Seventy percent of the State’s first cutting of alfalfa hay has been completed, 1 week behind last year. Hay condition rated 81 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition rated 76 percent good to excellent. 

Weather summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

The first full reporting period of June saw less thunderstorm activity with below-normal rainfall across most of Iowa; only pockets of central and northern Iowa received above-normal totals. Temperatures were up to three degrees above normal.

Sunday (2nd) morning showers in western Iowa dissipated as they moved east into drier air. Afternoon conditions were breezy with a southerly wind pushing temperatures through the upper 70s and low 80s. Isolated thunderstorms fired in northwestern Iowa just before midnight and spread over northern Iowa into Monday (3rd); Estherville (Emmet County) collected 2.10 inches with many northwest stations reporting 0.25 to 0.75 inch of rainfall. Additional thunderstorms formed in eastern Iowa into the afternoon hours with some sluggish cells producing localized flooding. Five stations in Dubuque County registered totals ranging from 2.00 inches in Dubuque to 2.83 inches at Asbury. Daytime temperatures were in the mid to upper 80s across the western two-thirds of Iowa and in the 70s in northeast Iowa under clouds. Skies cleared overnight into Tuesday (4th) with unseasonably warm morning lows in the upper 60s with isolated low 70s from central to eastern Iowa. A strong cold front produced several severe warned thunderstorms in the afternoon as a more consolidated line developed through the evening hours. The system cleared eastern Iowa by daybreak on Wednesday (5th). More than 50 stations reported at least an inch of rainfall with heavier amounts in central and north-central Iowa; Algona (Kossuth County) measured 2.52 inches with two Dallas County locations, Waukee and Clive, registering 2.88 inches and 3.44 inches, respectively. Most stations received at least 0.30 inch with a statewide average of 0.49 inch. Westerly winds built in behind the front along with temperatures in the upper 70s and low 80s under clear skies. Isolated thundershowers formed northwest and sped to the southeast into the evening with widespread totals under 0.10 inch.

Stars were visible Thursday (6th) morning with persisting westerly winds and lows in the upper 50s and low 60s. The daylight hours were pleasant with gusty northwesterly winds and spotty clouds here and there. Temperatures varied from the low 70s northeast to low 80s southwest. Calmer conditions developed overnight with variable winds and temperatures in the 50s west to low 60s east at 7:00 am on Friday (7th). Light showers pushed into northern Iowa as strong northwesterly flow produced a complex of fast-moving thunderstorms that grazed the southwest corner of Iowa. More showers formed farther east with the highest rain totals north; Osage (Mitchell County) and Stanley (Buchanan County) observed 0.40 inch with totals tapering off to the south. Heavier showers persisted in northeastern Iowa through Saturday (8th) morning with Waterloo Municipal Airport (Black Hawk County) reporting a 0.48-inch total. Winds shifted to a northerly direction with daytime highs in the mid 60s east to upper 70s west under mostly sunny skies. Spotty rain showers moved across western Iowa, though totals were generally light. Overnight lows into Sunday (9th) held in the 50s with calm to variable, light winds under mostly clear skies.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from 0.01 inch at several stations to 3.45 inches in Clive (Dallas County). The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.70 inch while the normal is 1.18 inches. Pocahontas (Pocahontas County) and Shenandoah (Page County) reported the week’s high temperature of 90 degrees on the 3rd and 8th, respectively, on average 10 degrees above normal. Stanley reported the week’s low temperature of 45 degrees on the 9th, 12 degrees below normal.

Weekly Crop Progress and Condition Report — June 4, 2024

From the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig commented on the Iowa Crop Progress and Condition Report released by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. The report is released weekly April through November. Additionally, the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship provides a weather summary each week during this time.

“May 2024 will go into the history books as one of the top 10 wettest Mays on record, which helped to break our long-running drought. Unfortunately, it will also be remembered for producing destructive severe weather and frustrating planting delays,” said Secretary Naig. “As we head into the three warmest months of the year and the heart of the growing season, some farmers are still finishing up planting within parts of the state. Farmers are also turning cattle out to pasture and working to complete other field work, including baling hay and applying crop protection products.”

The weekly report is also available on the USDA’s website at nass.usda.gov.

Crop report

Scattered showers throughout the State allowed Iowa farmers 3.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending June 2, 2024, according to the USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Service. Reports of standing water in fields were received from throughout the State. Planting and replanting of corn and soybeans were reported.

Topsoil moisture condition rated 0 percent very short, 3 percent short, 75 percent adequate and 22 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture condition rated 1 percent very short, 7 percent short, 77 percent adequate and 15 percent surplus.

Ninety-three percent of the expected corn crop has been planted, almost 2 weeks behind last year and 5 days behind the 5-year average. Corn emerged reached 81 percent, 6 days behind last year. Corn condition rated 73 percent good to excellent. Eighty-four percent of the expected soybean crop has been planted, 12 days behind last year but equal to the average. Sixty percent of the soybean crop has emerged, 1 week behind last year and 2 days behind the 5-year average. The first soybean condition rating of the season was 1 percent very poor, 4 percent poor, 22 percent fair, 59 percent good, and 14 percent excellent. Ninety-seven percent of the oat crop has emerged with 40 percent headed, 6 days ahead of last year and almost 2 weeks ahead of the average. Oat condition rated 82 percent good to excellent.

Forty percent of the State’s first cutting of alfalfa hay has been completed, 6 days behind last year. Hay condition rated 79 percent good to excellent. Pasture condition improved to 75 percent good to excellent. Wet conditions affecting livestock are now a concern.

Weather Summary

Provided by Justin Glisan, Ph.D., State Climatologist, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship

For the first time in several weeks, the final reporting period of May had below average rainfall across much of Iowa; only pockets of northwest and eastern Iowa observed unseasonably wet conditions. Temperatures varied from cooler than average east to near-normal across the state’s western half; the statewide average temperature was 64.4 degrees, 0.6 degree below normal.

A low pressure disturbance spun showers across northeastern Iowa on Sunday (26th) afternoon with additional isolated thunderstorms popping up in the southwest into the evening. Daytime temperatures varied from the mid 50s at some northeast stations to upper 70s southwest. Winds shifted northerly as the system pushed east with general rain totals in the 0.25- to 0.75-inch range across Iowa’s northeast quadrant; higher, but more localized amounts varied from 1.02 inches in McGregor (Clayton County) to 1.42 inches in Lansing (Allamakee County). Memorial Day (27th) started with mostly clear skies and temperatures in the low to mid 50s. Additional scattered thunderstorms fired with the heat of the day and propagated southeast through the evening hours. Rain totals were generally under 0.20 inch where it fell with pockets of heavier totals in eastern Iowa; Monticello (Jones County) collected 1.32 inches with 1.44 inches in Bedford (Taylor County). A weak cold front dropped south across Iowa into Tuesday (28th) leading to showers and light accumulations over several daytime hours. Conditions were pleasant with a northerly wind and temperatures in the mid 60s north to upper 70s southwest. Starry skies greeted the overnight hours into Wednesday (29th) with variable winds and widespread morning lows in the upper 40s and low 50s. With high pressure dominating the Upper Midwest, mostly sunny conditions persisted as daytime temperatures held in the low to mid 70s.

Thursday (30th) started unseasonably warm with lows in the mid to upper 60s. Clouds increased in western Iowa as a line of showers pushed over the Nebraska border. Showers lingered in southwestern Iowa before consolidating with another thin line into the afternoon hours. Many stations in the western quarter of Iowa collected at least 0.25 inch with stations near College Springs (Page County) and Lake Park (Dickinson) observing 1.06 to 1.51 inches, respectively. A secondary disturbance brought light rain to eastern Iowa overnight into Friday (31st) as a low pressure system approached the state from the west. Highs pushed into the low 80s in eastern Iowa with cooler temperatures west where showers and thunderstorms developed and then covered much of western Iowa through the remainder of the day. Stronger thunderstorms dropped heavier rain across northwest counties with Ringsted (Emmett County) hitting 1.00 inch and Orange City (Sioux County) observing 4.12 inches; widespread totals of 0.30 to 0.50 inch were found farther south and east. Light showers continued in eastern Iowa through Saturday (1st) morning with clouds clearing east to west into the afternoon. Highs were seasonal over much of the state, though low 60s were found in eastern Iowa. Foggy conditions developed at many eastern stations towards daybreak with morning lows in the mid 50 to low 60s.

Weekly precipitation totals ranged from 0.03 inch in Pella (Marion County) to 4.35 inches in Orange City. The statewide weekly average precipitation was 0.74 inch while the normal is 1.08 inches. Des Moines International Airport (Polk County) reported the week’s high temperature of 83 degrees on the 2nd, five degrees above average. Multiple stations reported the week’s low temperature of 42 degrees on the 29th, on average ten degrees below normal.